Tag Archives: technology

Tea & Review: Murder in the Generative Kitchen

(Graphic Courtesy of World Weaver Press)

Murder in the Generative Kitchen

by: Meg Pontecorvo

Meg Pontecorvo’s Murder in the Generative Kitchen poses many relevant questions that in today’s society we seem to be scratching the surface of.

Technology is such a theme in itself. We, as a people, are constantly looking to improve and grow our technology. We keep trying to get technology to fill the gaps and the spaces in our lives that we feel are lacking.

A lot of what Pontecorvo does reminded me a lot of the show Black Mirror, but Pontecorvo is clever. She doesn’t make the central theme as obvious. She makes her readers work for it.

Continue reading Tea & Review: Murder in the Generative Kitchen

Astro-bite: Notes on Liberation

Editor’s Note: A forthcoming collection of poetry titled Liberating the Astronauts by Christina M. Rau will be debuting in 2017. Tea & Fiction is very excited to share excerpts from the collection. From the Pointer Sisters doing the Neutron Dance to David Bowman’s exclamation while traveling through the stargate near Jupiter— from stealing Joan Didion’s sadness to erasing F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby— this collection weaves its way through the paradoxical struggle of wanting freedom while fearing it.

In Liberating The Astronauts, we see that not fitting in gives us the freedom to stand out.

Continue reading Astro-bite: Notes on Liberation

Astro-bite: Curiosity

Editor’s Note: A forthcoming collection of poetry titled Liberating the Astronauts by Christina M. Rau will be debuting in 2017. Tea & Fiction is very excited to share excerpts from the collection. From the Pointer Sisters doing the Neutron Dance to David Bowman’s exclamation while traveling through the stargate near Jupiter— from stealing Joan Didion’s sadness to erasing F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby— this collection weaves its way through the paradoxical struggle of wanting freedom while fearing it.

In Liberating The Astronauts, we see that not fitting in gives us the freedom to stand out.

from Curiosity

Though sound does not carry
it hums to itself, each movement

Continue reading Astro-bite: Curiosity

Westworld: Episode 2 – Chestnut

Warning! Spoilers! 

When we last left off in Westworld things were a little bit – up in the air?

We had thoroughly gone through several days of many of the “host” characters.

Dolores: the farmer’s daughter.

Teddy: Dolores’ (former?) lover. He gets killed a lot.

Abernathy: Dolores’ father who is pulled from a storyline after it becomes apparent that the upgrade has caused him to have less than normal host-like reactions.

Dolores is violently raped by one of the park’s visitors (played by Ed Helms) who in search of a different, hidden storyline somewhere within the Westworld Park. We’re not entirely sure what his deal is.

At the end of the previous episode, is comes to light that an update to the software has caused the hosts to act strangely. But now, now we come to realize that the many different ‘storylines’ the hosts have lived are now rising to the surface as actual memories and causing them to gain self-awareness.

Continue reading Westworld: Episode 2 – Chestnut

Astro-bite: Opposition Night

Editor’s Note: A forthcoming collection of poetry titled: “Liberating the Astronauts” by Christina M. Rau  will be debuting in 2017.

 Tea & Fiction is very excited to share excerpts from the collection. From the Pointer Sisters doing the Neutron Dance to David Bowman’s exclamation while traveling through the star gate near Jupiter— from stealing Joan Didion’s sadness to erasing F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby— this collection weaves its way through the paradoxical struggle of wanting freedom while fearing it. 

In “Liberating The Astronauts”, we see that not fitting in gives us the freedom to stand out.

from Opposition Night

III.

Photovoltaic power is all the rage!
Asteroid ablation! Comet ablation!
Every kind of ablation you could desire!
A plume of heat and laser light and
Kapow! Kablooey! Kaboom!

Continue reading Astro-bite: Opposition Night

Tea & Review: Blair Witch

I was 13-years old when “The Blair Witch” was released. My parents and I went to The Bridge theatre in San Francisco. Watching Rated-R movies wasn’t a new thing but I think this was probably my first legitimate horror movie. I had no idea what to expect, but I was excited. Everyone was talking about. Everyone in school was talking about it. I was sure it was going to be an experience.

I remember my mom digging her nails digging into my leg for most of the movie. It didn’t help that the theatre was small, which only made the whole found footage, jittery camera thing so much more intense.

Continue reading Tea & Review: Blair Witch

Tea & Review: All The Birds in the Sky

All The Birds in the Sky

By: Charlie Jane Anders

I strongly suspected I would like “All the Birds in the Sky” by io9 editor Charlie Jane Anders. When I put out an open call through my FaceBook for science fiction / fantasy books I immediately checked it out the description on Amazon when someone suggested I check it out.

The story centers on Patricia Delfine and Laurence Armstead. Patricia discovers she has a strong connection to nature with her ability to talk to animals. Laurence is a tech nerd who a future genius in the making.

Continue reading Tea & Review: All The Birds in the Sky