Tag Archives: film

Tea & Review: ‘The Shape of Water’ is Incandescent

{All images used courtesy Fox Searchlight Pictures.}

Note: this article was also published on Contents May Vary.

The Shape of Water, written by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor, directed by Guillermo del Toro. Produced by Fox Searchlight Pictures. Copyright 2017. (Seen December 5, 2017.)

You ever read a book where the writing is so glorious it almost distracts from the plot of the book? Where you spend just as much time admiring the writing as you do thinking about the actual book? The Shape of Water is a gloriously filmed movie, with absolutely gorgeous cinematography — almost to the point of it being a distraction.

Set during the Cold War, The Shape of Water is del Toro’s take on the fairy tale. We are introduced to Elisa (Sally Hawkins), a mute woman. She works alongside Zelda (Octavia Spencer) during the night shift at a government facility as a cleaning woman. She lives with Giles (Richard Jenkins), a closeted gay man who does artwork for advertisements, watching musicals and variety shows on television. And every day is the same.

Every day is the same, that is, until Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon) is introduced, having acquired ‘the asset’ in South America for the facility to study. At first, we only see a container with water, with movements indicating some sort of creature. But one evening, Elisa is cleaning the room it is in, and meets him (Doug Jones).

At first, it’s a friendship: she sees him as a bit of a pet, trying to tame it and not wanting to see him hurt. But, this is at heart a fairy tale, and so the friendship turns to love as Elisa explains to Giles at one point that the amphibian man (as is listed on IMDB) is the only person to not care that she is mute, and sees her for who she is.

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Fandom Friday: My ‘Citizen Kane’ List — Round 1

{Header image courtesy Pixabay and used under a Creative Commons Public Domain license..}

Note: this article was also published on Contents May Vary.

I have a list of movies I’ve started calling my Citizen Kane list. I’m sure it’s something that we all can relate to: movies (as well as other media, for that matter) that, while we’ve never actually seen, are such a part of our cultural landscape that we may as well consider them watched. Funnily enough, Citizen Kane is no longer on my list as I finally saw a few years ago.

Here are five from my current list of movies that I’ve never actually seen from beginning to end, but I know all about them. And yes, the goal is to eventually take these off the list. Maybe when I invent that 48 hour day.

First is my genre shame: I have never seen Blade Runner. Even worse? My partner and I even own a copy. The problem? It has both the original and the director’s cut, and so I don’t know which one I want to watch first. I’ve seen arguments for both being the one to watch, and while I will definitely watch both, I know the first one I watch will be the one I will relate to more. The idea of replicants, the cyberpunk elements, the performance of Harrison Ford and Rutger Hauer, and the concepts behind it have colored the visual world of science fiction since 1982, so there isn’t much here I won’t already know. With the sequel coming soon, I plan on watching it. I just need to decide which one to watch first.

Continue reading Fandom Friday: My ‘Citizen Kane’ List — Round 1

Astro-bite: Notes on Liberation

Editor’s Note: A forthcoming collection of poetry titled Liberating the Astronauts by Christina M. Rau will be debuting in 2017. Tea & Fiction is very excited to share excerpts from the collection. From the Pointer Sisters doing the Neutron Dance to David Bowman’s exclamation while traveling through the stargate near Jupiter— from stealing Joan Didion’s sadness to erasing F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby— this collection weaves its way through the paradoxical struggle of wanting freedom while fearing it.

In Liberating The Astronauts, we see that not fitting in gives us the freedom to stand out.

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Tea & Fury: Tim Burton and the Facade of Outcasts

When I first heard about Tim Burton’s comments  on diversity in film on the website Bustle, to say I was a little angry might have been putting it lightly. Because as I stewed over his words something I like to call, Tea and Fury was born (see podcast above.).

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