Category Archives: Movies

Fandom Friday: My ‘Citizen Kane’ List — Round 1

{Header image courtesy Pixabay and used under a Creative Commons Public Domain license..}

Note: this article was also published on Contents May Vary.

I have a list of movies I’ve started calling my Citizen Kane list. I’m sure it’s something that we all can relate to: movies (as well as other media, for that matter) that, while we’ve never actually seen, are such a part of our cultural landscape that we may as well consider them watched. Funnily enough, Citizen Kane is no longer on my list as I finally saw a few years ago.

Here are five from my current list of movies that I’ve never actually seen from beginning to end, but I know all about them. And yes, the goal is to eventually take these off the list. Maybe when I invent that 48 hour day.

First is my genre shame: I have never seen Blade Runner. Even worse? My partner and I even own a copy. The problem? It has both the original and the director’s cut, and so I don’t know which one I want to watch first. I’ve seen arguments for both being the one to watch, and while I will definitely watch both, I know the first one I watch will be the one I will relate to more. The idea of replicants, the cyberpunk elements, the performance of Harrison Ford and Rutger Hauer, and the concepts behind it have colored the visual world of science fiction since 1982, so there isn’t much here I won’t already know. With the sequel coming soon, I plan on watching it. I just need to decide which one to watch first.

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May the Force Be With You: Star Wars 40th Anniversary

A few years ago, I worked at a summer camp. There was a particular child at this summer camp that came in every day clad in Star Wars shirts and shoes. It impressed the staff and was a testament that is possible to parent while instilling a healthy geek background.

Obviously, the child hadn’t even been born when A New Hope came out in 1977. What has always been impressive about the Star Wars universe is its ability to remain relevant to generations that followed.

My fondest memory is when I used my dad’s metallic basketball pump as a lightsaber. It got dinged up, a lot, as I waved it around whacking into other things, pretending I was battling Darth Vader.

I was not a girly-girly. I liked Sailor Moon but prior to that, I fancied myself a Jedi.

Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher, RIP) was kickass. I mean, when we first see her or really hear her speak she’s Darth Vader’s prisoner. But she’s not small. She’s not scared. She’s defiant. She’s everything women want to be when surrounded by men who want to destroy her world (literally).

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Tea & Review: A Suitable Girl

A Suitable Girl debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 22nd 2017.

A Suitable Girl

Directors: Sarita Khurana and Smriti Mundhra

At the beginning of A Suitable Girl we come to the juxtaposition between two very stark moments in time.

As an audience, we are given a montage of images: an evolution of little Indian girls growing under the watchful eye of their families.

But the narration offers us what is to be their future. It is a blunt, sweeping attempt to angle us all in the proper direction: marriage.

There will eventually come a time where she will marry and leave her family behind.

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Tea & Review: Beauty and the Beast (2017)

Beauty and the Beast – Not Quite the Original

Beauty and the Beast (2017), stars Emma Watson as Belle and Dan Stevens as Beast/Prince Adam.  It is the newest live-action movie by Disney.  

Belle is also the third princess made into a live-action and the words “third time’s the charm” definitely rang true.

Beauty and the Beast hits a unique spot for both being modern and nostalgic fans who grew up with the 1991 version.

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Tea & Review: The Red Turtle (2016)

The Red Turtle is an animated film about a man stranded on an island who later meets a large red turtle, hence the title. It is also a Studio Ghibli and Wild Bunch film. This is the first film for Studio Ghibli since 2014. While this is the first feature film for animator director Michaël Dudok de Wit.
 

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Tea & Review: Miss Hokusai (2015)

Miss Hokusai is a anime about Katsushika Oi. Born O-Ei (Anne Watanabe) and her life as an artist during the Edo era in Japan. Her father Tetsuzo (Yutaka Matsushige), is a famous artist that works under the pseudonym of Hokusai. Hence the title.
 
Her life is like that of a traditional apprentice. She learns her trade and works under her father’s name. She doesn’t sign any of her own works because as great as she is, she is still Tetsuzo’s student. And it isn’t until the end of the movie that Tetsuzo tells her that she should think of an artist name. Meaning he has deemed her worthy enough that she should sign her own works.
 

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Tea & Review: Your Name (Kimi no Na wa)

Your Name is a Japanese anime movie that was released in 2016.  The story revolves around two high schoolers Mitsuha Miyamizu (Mono Kamishiraishi) and Taki Tachibana (Ryunosuku Kamiki).  

Mitsuha lives in the rural town near the mountains and is a Miko (shrine maiden) of the family shrine.  

Taki lives in Tokyo and works part time as a waiter in an Italian restaurant.  Their lives are drastically different from each other’s, including their temperaments

Then, for some mysterious reason, they begin to switch bodies.  At first, each believes they were having an extremely realistic dream.  Until their respective friends and families comment on how strange they were acting.  Then, after finding notes they both leave for the other, they both realize they have a problem on their hands.

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Podcast: The Redemption of M. Night Shyamalan?

M. Night Shyamalan’s career of producing good movies has been an unfortunate pattern of hits and misses.

In 1999, Shyamalan hit the blockbuster payload when The Sixth Sense gave the universe the ultimate freaky line that would stand the test of time.

“I see dead people.”

Shymalan’s ultimately created a shock and awe template for his films that left audience members with a twist, with sprinkles of Alfred Hitchcock seen throughout.

But following the horrible, white washed flop of Shyamalan’s 2010 film The Last Airbender the director began what we could easily call a “creative freefall into hell”.

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